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Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)
PBS
Aug 28, 2009 6:00pm EDT
the rewriting of america's restrictive immigration laws, drafted in the 1920s. he fought hard for the immigration and nationality act of 1965, signed by president lyndon johnson. and as america inches toward majority-minority status, with the descendants of european immigrants a declining share of the population, the face of today's america is the one kennedy's efforts helped create, for better... >> i think it is fair to say that senator kennedy was one of the architects of the america of the future. >> suarez: ... or for worse. >> the '65 act put american immigration on auto-pilot. >> suarez: by the time of the john kennedy administration, america had absorbed the huge ellis island generations of immigrants who poured in from europe from roughly 1880 to 1920. president kennedy, whose great- grandparents came to boston from ireland, supported scrapping the existing quota system that used 19th-century america's ethnic makeup as a template for letting in new arrivals, favoring europeans and effectively sealing off newcomers from the rest of the world. on the senate floor in 200
PBS
Aug 10, 2009 6:00pm EDT
culture; and another in our "blueprint america" series: tonight a look at a highway versus mass transit argument in alabama. major funding for the newshour with jim lehrer is provided by: ( hard rock guitar riff playing ) >> we are intel, sponsors of tomorrow. >> what the world needs now is energy. the energy to get the economy humming again. the energy to tackle challenges like climate change. what if that energy came from an energy company? everyday, chevron invests $62 million in people, in ideas-- seeking, teaching, building. fueling growth around the world to move us all ahead. this is the power of human energy. chevron. the national science foundation. supporting education and research across all fields of science and engineering. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> lehrer: iraq was hit with a new wave of bombings today that killed at least 48 people. more than 250 others were wounded. the at
PBS
Aug 26, 2009 6:00pm EDT
. >> woodruff: senator edward kennedy, patriarch of america's best-known political family, often called the "liberal lion" of the senate, died at his home in hyannis port, massachusetts, last night after battling brain cancer for a little more than a year. during his 46 year tenure in washington, he pushed for legislation on education, poverty and health care. today he was widely remembered as a gifted leader and legislator. we begin our coverage with the personal memories of one of his closest friends in the senate, republican orrin hatch of utah. >> senator thank you very much for talking with us. >> so nice to be with you, judy. >> woodruff: what are you thinking and feeling on this day? >> naturally, i'm griefing. i knew ted was going to die but i prayed for him every day hoping for a miracle. i chatted with his wife, vicki, this morning and she of course was broken up but she was very, very kind and nice as she really is. i'm going to miss that man. we-- we-- i went back there to fight ted kennedy, and i think we fought each other for all of my 33 years, but when we got together, w
WETA
Aug 4, 2009 7:47pm EDT
i heard tha it spread in mexico then also spread in america. >> i take precautions for myself, i clean th pigs and make su i wear a mask when i enter the cge. >> reporter: no one is sure whether thearmers are adopting su practicees o whether most farmers n afor protective gear. and even though the fear of the bird u and swinelu viruss mixing, no ones sure when or if such a superug ight emerg dr. o'leary hds the world ealth organization office cambodia. >> i think it's largely a theoretical concer at this point, because we have many kinds of vuss around us all the time. so while we have to say that it's possible tat thesewo or oter virus may mix and reult in a new virus, that's essential always the case. we can have such a enario y time. >> repoer: he says the risk diseases that jump from one specs to another has risen in rece decades, with dozens of example from e bow la t lyme disease. >> theestruction of forests are ohhe urbanizion of people, that'sreated new opportunies for new kinds of interaction betweenumans and animals. another is the ease with which people move aroundhe w
WETA
Aug 12, 2009 7:25pm EDT
in america is growin d see which communities hav bn most affected with our countyy-county map. you can go to nshour.pbs.org. next tonight: thcontinuing crackdown in myaar, the countryormally known as burma. newshour correspondent tom beaen narrates our setup report. >> reporter: ag san suu kyi awoke today in the homehat has been her prison f much of the last 20 years. the democracy activi and nobel laureate was coicted yesterday for olating the terms of her homeetention. the pressive military regime in myanmar has kept her confed for her litical activities. yesterday's decision stems fm a bizarre incident in may, involving an american manho swam across a lake to suu kys home. john yettaw claimed was trying to saveer from assassination. he stay at her home for two days. both were arrested and jaid on various chars yesterday, suu kyi was stenced to three ars at hard labor. but the sentenceas quickly reduc by the junta's leader to 18 months of he confinement. yettaw was sentencto seven yearsf hard labor. both verdicts will appealed, but suu kyi's attorney id it came as no surprise. he spok
PBS
Aug 13, 2009 6:00pm EDT
is the national campaign manager of health care for america now, a liberal group which has urged its supporters to turn out at the meetings. thank you both for being here. we thank you for being part of this discussion. and dick armey, i'm going to come straight to you on the basics. you believe that there should be some form of reform of health care, health insurance, but a more limited form than what the president favors. >> yes, i do. we go back to things i've argued for, tort reform, as much as $100 billion just sheer abject waste. >> woodruff: tort reform, for people who don't know the legal term means? >> it causes doctors to order up extra procedures on behalf of patients that are not needed medically, but they need them in case they end up in a courtroom. i watch this process, the thing that breaks your heart about that is especially with older folks to be subjected to extra procedures that are not medically necessary, it's a very difficult burden for them to carry when they are already oftentimes quite fragile, and the procedures themselves can be quite a stressful experience for them.
PBS
Aug 3, 2009 6:00pm EDT
administration urged the senate today to follow suit. bank of america will pay a penalty of $33 million to the securities and exchange commission. the company was accused of misleading investors in its purchase of merrill lynch last year. bank of america initially said merrill would not pay year-end bonuses before the deal closed. in fact, the s.e.c. said bank of america had already approved up to $5.8 billion in bonus payments. and still to come on the newshour tonight: scarcity amid plenty; food insecurity; and vitamin d deficiency. that follows the latest in our series on the sticking points in the battle over health reform. tonight, taxing benefits. it's one of the key issues the senate finance committee is grappling with as it tries to craft a bipartisan health care bill. betty ann bowser begins with this report. our health unit is a partnership with the robert wood johnson foundation. >> one idea on the table topi pay for health-care reform is taxing the most costly of employer-provided health insurance benefits. the so-called cadillac plans provided to a small percentage of worke
WETA
Aug 4, 2009 7:17pm EDT
delinquent mortgages, while bank of america, with a much high volu, has modified ju 4% of its delinquent home loans. th wells fargoumber was 6%. j. p. morgan chase came in a 20%. david a nider o j..morgan ase says thos numbers don't tell the whole stor >> it's going t vary widely epending on where the servicers is located, h big the servicer is. one thing we can't forget is h many customers are we actually hping, and if you look at the size of howany stomers chase has helped, versus the ze of our agegate portfolio, we've perfmed very well. >> report: barr would not characterize individl leers, but promised re scrutiny. we are going to be increasing focused on e lag ards. looking to see ways tourther incentivize the performance. freddie mac, our compliance agent, will be cducting second look reviews, auditing mples of mortgage loa applications for modification that hadeendenied. >> reporter: governme officials advise borrowers to seek free counselg to aid foreclosure rescue scams, and to t to help them negiate with banks. as for the hoyles, they are temporarily movinin with relativesntil they
WETA
Aug 10, 2009 7:00pm EDT
there clear are peoplein america who believe in estlishing euthenasia. >> reporter: what is fueling the fi a provion in the 1200-page hse healthcare reform bill that wou allow seniors to seek what lawmakers called advanced care planning consuation. at provides end of life services includi palliative compare a hospice. the counseling with the physician uld be optional and medicare would pay for it once every five years. critics of the democrats hlthcare reform bills have seized on this. on ytube, e-mailhains and blogs online. alaska's former republican governor, sarah palin, hosted thi entry on her facebook page friy. the america inow and love is ot one in which myparents or baby with down's syndro will have to stan in front of obama's dbt panel so bureaucrats can decide based on a subjective judgmentf their level of productivity and societyhether they areorthy ofealthcare. such a syem is down right evil. today, palinrged people to engagin civil diourse when attending twn hall meetings spsored by democratic members of the househo are home on recess. those members found ma seniors across the
WETA
Aug 13, 2009 7:00pm EDT
; and richard ksch is the national camign manager of health care for america no a liberal grouwhich has urged its pporters to turn out at the meetin. thank you both for being her we tank you for being prt of this discussion. and dick armey, i'm gog to come straight you on the basis. you believthat there should be some fm of reform of health care, heal insurance, bu a more limited form than what the presint favors. >> yes, i do. go back to things i've argd for, rteform, as much as $100 bilon just sheer abject waste. >> woodruff: tort refor, for people whdon't know the legal term mean >> it cases doctors to oder up extra procures on behal of patnts that are not needed medically, but they need themin case they end up in a courtroom. i watch this process, the thinthat breaks your heart aut thats especially wi older folks to be subjted to extra predures that are no medically necessary, it's a ve difficult buen for them to rry when they are already tentimes quite fragi, and the procedures themsels can be quite a stressful experience for them. >>oodruff: so tort reform would be an importan change?
PBS
Aug 21, 2009 6:00pm EDT
with latin american art and a lot of cuban art but other parts of latin america. my health is an expression of my mind. art has helped educate my way of seeing things. back in the early 80s, late '70s, there was very little knowledge about latin american art even in american art circles. america was basically inviceable. so i found it very challenging and interesting to, you know, to write about latin america, going to latin america to discover the art and write about it in american and european art journals. how does an artist take apart the visual world and reconfigure it to make it his own or her own. you in a work of art that something that helped me a lot as a poet. my poetry is very visual as a result of that. i was born in cuba. and although i came at the age of six, my family and i came after the communist takeover in cuba. we arrived in december of 1960, first going to chicago and eventually moving to tampa. and then to miami. but when a rifed in miami in the '60s, and then growing up here from that point on, miami was a place where artists were creating, where musicians were playi
WETA
Aug 27, 2009 7:00pm EDT
on a.b.c.'s "gd morning america." >> i ink that the senators made a very reasonle request. it is to permit e governor to make an interim appointmenfor about the fivmonths it takes between the creation of new vacancy, betwe now and when tht special election occurs. i support the idea of a scial election which is provid for in our curnt law and the enator did as well. >> reporter: meanwhile, in shington the national portrt allery unveiled a rendering kennedy by the pop artist dy whol. elsewhere the capital, kennedy was remembed not as the scionf a political dynast but as a gentle and unassuming tur. keedy was for years one of a cadre of senators and congrsional staff who worked wih children as part of the national "everyby wins" reading and menting program. thi grader larenai swann read with kennedy at bryt elentary school. >> i remember the fit time he came d read with me. >> was he funny? >> we played rock per scissors, whoever won wouldead theage... ( laughs ) ... but senator nnedy won, so and we ok turns reading >reporter: it was not until she returnehome that first day
WETA
Aug 31, 2009 7:00pm EDT
-fac, not complete new to this game. but whatan america exct as it engages with japan wi him as prime minister. >> i would be remiss i didn't point out tt he was a gradua my university -- >> his graduate degree, yes. >> his an engineering degree from there andany ys the top leadership of th dpj incling mr. hatoyama but others as ll, they are very senior schooled politicians, they all ca out of the ldp. hatoyamas a grandson of the japane prime minister in the 1'50s. he comes fr an old importt political family in japan. so these a not fresh faces in that sense. they're not radics. they really comeout of the mainstream of japase politics. althou on the other hand, if you look the new members of the parliament that have been elected, a third of theare brand-new to the par and all almost all of those are dpj. so we will have a t of new faces, a lot of new blood but athe bottom, not at the top. >> daniesnooeted heer and sheila smith, thank you very much >> thank you. >> lehrer:ow, the tough path to finding a job in this economy. our economics corrpondent paul solman has the stor it's part of his ongoin
PBS
Aug 12, 2009 6:00pm EDT
in avoided hospitalizations. >> reporter: hospitalizations are the single most expensive item on america's health care tab. >> there is my girl. >> reporter: staying out of the hospital is exactly what she wants to do. >> al has gone to the hospital approximately once a week. >> reporter: that was before she enrolled in the billings program of all-inclusive care for the elderly, or pace. for an annual fee paid by medicare or medicaid, all health care services are coordinated by a team of medical and social service providers. >> and she wants to just check another thyroid level. >> reporter: pace also provides its members with transportation to doctors appointments and a day center. with consistent access to care, frees and the other pace members are able to continue living on their own instead of ending up in a nursing home which is much more expensive, but when billings officials talk about the key to keeping medical costs down, the one thing they always point to is the way they pay their doctors. >> physicians are paid a competitive salary, but it is not based on whether they see patie
PBS
Aug 14, 2009 6:00pm EDT
's one of the diminishing number of areas where america still has a lead and if we don't lead, someone else will. >> reporter: norm augustine, thank you very much for talking with us. >> thank you. >> lehrer: and to the analysis of shields and brooks-- syndicated columnist mark shields and "new york times" columnist david brooks. how do you portray the saga of the health care debate on this friday night? >> well, the polls are still terrible. there's still a majority against it. so it's sort of an odd situation where you look in washington, you see pretty much momentum toward it, slow compromises, and you see the democrats with plenty of votes, but are we really going to pass the most major domestic reform in a generation when the majority of the american people are against it? that's sort of an oddity. and the second thing, as we've seen in these highly reasoned town hall meetings in the country, it's a pretty traditional left-right fight. you have republicans and democrats and in the age of obama where we're supposed to rise above that, obama has got himself into a pretty traditional
PBS
Aug 5, 2009 6:00pm EDT
, and if we do those things and they don't meet the test of grass-roots public opinion in america, remember, this is a democracy. we shouldn't be doing them anyway. so i'm going to have 20 of these meetings throughout the state of iowa. i invite ioans come in and i want to listen to their opinions. i want to answer their questions and it's mawe're talking about doing. and i'm against the pelosi bill. i'm against the kennedy bill. i hope i can be for a bipartisan bill. i won't know until we get it developed. but if i can't defend that, then we shouldn't be doing it, or any plan, the pelosi plan or the kennedy plan or the obama plan. >> woodruff: senator charles grassley, we appreciate your answering our questions. thank you so much. >> thank you. >> ifill: finally tonight, the problems created by trash floating in the pacific ocean. here's an encore of a spencer michels science unit report. >> former owner of the a furniture repair business in long beach, california, and an amateur scientist, surprised the scientific world with the discovery he made in the middle of the pacific ocean. while
PBS
Aug 6, 2009 6:00pm EDT
america, from britain, from elsewhere to train and, indeed, to bring training capabilities with them. so the fear is that somalia, as i said, an ungoverned space, is becoming a location for these jihadi trainers. >> warner: now what does the u.s. support really consist of? >> well, what we heard from hillary clinton today was a reaffirmation of u.s. commitment to support the transitional federal government of president sharif. now, what that means, it means... it basically means arms and it means aid. now, in june the state department admitted that it had sent in around 40 tons of arms and ammunition to the transitional federal government and hillary clinton said they will continue to provide arms and ammunition. they will also help with training. but also there will be a humanitarian aid aspect. around 40% of somalis ten million people are now in need of humanitarian aid. there's a drought which is affecting food production. plus, of course, the ongoing civil war which is causing terrible strife for people. thousands have died, hundreds of thousands have been forced from their homes. th
PBS
Aug 7, 2009 6:00pm EDT
america foundation and writer for the "new yorker." he's the author of "ghost wars: the secret history of the cia, afghanistan and bin laden." welcome to you both, mr. ambassador. let me begin with you. how confident are you, is your government that by masoud is dead. >> 100 percent zrpt can only be achieved after dna testing and a lot of physical evidence has been processed. but other than that, there are a lot of pointers as a result of this, most people believe that he is, indeed, dead. and his own group has announced that. >> and if that's the case, how significant would that be in terms of your government struggle against this militant movement? >> if he is indeed dead then that is definitely a major advance in proving pakistan's determination and the determination of the united states to eliminate extremists and ter rusts from our region. of course the death of one individual is still just the death of unindividual there are others who are part of a broader movement and we will have to continue to make sure that we eliminate the hard-line irreconcilable elements and that we reach
WETA
Aug 11, 2009 7:00pm EDT
of america commuteewer than 30 miles a day, most voltdrivers will erate on a dai basis without havi to use aingle dro of ga. incidentallyit's also much less expsive to drive a car with electricity. in detroit, for example, you can char the volt at night, off peak for about five cen per kill wat hour which means a full 40-mile charge of the volt will costabout 40 nts. >> lehrer: the vo could cost arou $40,000 when it hits deal showroomsext year. henderson said the price is expected to co down in future ars. he also acknowledged pluing in thear will be a problem for ople in apartments. ultimately, g.m.xpects charging stations to meethat demand. medicaresearchers may have found anothecritical use for pirin. a new study indates it could cut the risk of death colon cancer paties by 30%. the findings are in t "journal of t american medical association." the patients took aspin in conjunction withurgery and chemotherapy. colo-rectal cancer kills nrly 50,000 americans each year. and still to come othe newshour tonig, remembering eunice shrive but first, update on the situation in the war rn demo
WETA
Aug 14, 2009 7:00pm EDT
diminishing number of are wher america still has a le and if we don't lea, someone elseill. >>reporter nor austine, thank you very much r talking witus. >> thank you >> lehrer: and to thanalysis of selds and brooks-- sdicated columnist mark shields and "new yk times" columnisdavid brooks. how dyou portray the saga of the health care debaten this friday nig? >> well, the pls are still terrle. there's still a majory against it. so 's sort of an oddituation ere you look in washington, you see prett much momentum toward it, sl compromises and you see theemocrats with plenty ovotes, but aree really going to pa the most major domest reform in a generation when themajority of the ameran people are against it? that's sort of an oddity. and th second thing, as 've seen in these highly reasone wn hall meetings i the cotry,it's pret traditionalleft-right fight. you have repubicans and democratand in the age of obama where we're suppos to se above that, obama has got himself into a pretty traditional partisanattle, the health carversion of the thomasearings or som other very h partisanight. lehrer: is
PBS
Aug 11, 2009 6:00pm EDT
and the violence in congo. b, congo, for the longest time, saw that america is looking the other direction and tolerating the killing of -- at least five million people, the statistics -- >> lehrer: five million people -- that's an extraordinary number of people. >> and this is a 10-year-old statistic which has never been updated, actually, so it's significant in her message and the u.s. message toward congo that we do care about you, her investment, her announcement about $17 million for investment on women and children, her investment -- her declaration that we need to invest in professionalizing the congolese army and in the government. it's significant for congo and it's the first time that congo gets this level of attention from the u.s. -- it's also significant to neighboring countries in terms of sending the message that this is important and we -- and we have the attention that we have -- we want to have a peace and civility in the region, so it's actually quite significant for congo and its neighbors. >> lehrer: is there a simple explanation as to what this fighting is really all
PBS
Aug 17, 2009 6:00pm EDT
ravine. >> reporter: 2:00 a.m. en route to one of america's most besieged outposts. the pilots won't land in this valley except on the darkest of nights when they're escorted by gunships. the taliban often lie in wait in the darkness of this remote valley. the gunships fire a missile into the hillside. a warning shot. >> reporter: outpost keating is the furthest reach of american power, surrounded by mountains near the pakistani border, a landing so difficult the pilots worry their rotor blades could clip the hillside. this is the only way in or out. the hills all around are for beauty but also constant, deadly attacks. >> we're surrounded, sitting in a bowl, we're constantly on observation. >> captain porter leads a few dozen men pinned down among the sandbags. they don't have much contact with the locals apart from when they shoot at their base. >> we've had over 35 contacts with the enemy since we have been here in just under three months, so they're keeping us on our toes. my boss told me to come here. >> reporter: an afghan army patrol returns to base from the hills accompanied by la
PBS
Aug 19, 2009 6:00pm EDT
symptoms during the workday, the c.d.c. recommends that that employee be asked to go home. in america, we love to praise the puritan work ethic and with reason. but this fall, it would serve the country better to praise common sense and responsibility. >> lehrer: companies were also advised to let at-risk employees -- like pregnant women and people with chronic diseases-- get vaccinated first. the government plans to have 45 million doses of the swine flu vaccine on hand by mid-october. on wall street today, stocks and oil prices were up after a government report showed oil inventories were depleted, indicating energy demand is rising. the dow jones industrial average gained 61 points to close at 9,279. the nasdaq rose 13 points to close at 1,969. the price of crude oil climbed more than 4%. in new york trading, the cost of a barrel passed $72. >> lehrer: and still to come on the "newshour" tonight: the swiss bank deal; crowded california prisons; and "60 minutes" creator hewitt. that follows our health care reform update. tonight, we look at the squabbling among democrats. "newshour" cor
PBS
Aug 20, 2009 6:00pm EDT
in north america america as soon as 2030. critics say connecting the wind power to the grid on a larger scale may prove difficult. but shirley says she believes it can happen. >> people are excited about the opportunities that exist in green energy. and they want to know what can i do for my environment? what can i do for my family? and what can i do for my state? and wind answers all three of those. >> reporter: wright works at the local wal-mart and lives at home in edmund, oklahoma, with his family as he studies. his dad, nathan, sr., was a roughneck oil worker in the gulf of mexico straight out of high school and got out of the business when nathan was young because after a boom came the bust of the '80s which some say was the most defining economic event in oklahoma in the last half century. >> i never wanted them to go into that business. i guess being 18 when i started, i just wanted something that... where you didn't just have to get out there and break his back everyday like so many of these guys do. >> we've encouraged our kids don't put all your ducks in one tub. have a backu
PBS
Aug 25, 2009 6:00pm EDT
, go into bankruptcy. he was also involved in bank of america's controversial acquisition of merrill lynch. he later pushed for the something shally approved large bank bailout of last fall. the fed pumped an additional $2 trillion into the banking system to stablize it. and through it all, bernanke has kept interest rates at record lows. near zero. this morning the chairman spoke of his decision as he looked forward. >> we have been bold or deliberate as circumstances demanded. but our objective remains constant, to refor a more stable financial and economic environment in which opportunity can again flourish and in which americans' hard work and creativity can receive their proper rewards. >> reporter: last week bernanke gave a cautiously optimistic appraisal of that objective, telling a meeting of global banking officials that the u.s. economy is poised for growth. for a closer look at the fed and budget news, we turn to maya macguineas, president of the committee for a responsible federal budget and director of the fiscal policy program at the new america foundation, a non- parti
WETA
Aug 6, 2009 7:00pm EDT
foreign fighters from the pakistan, om he swat vall, guysoming in from america, from britain, fom elsewhereo train and, indeed, toring training capabilies withhem. so the fear is that somalia, a i said an ungovned space, is becing aocation for these jihadi trainers >> warner:now what do the u.s. support real nsist of? >> well, wt weeard from hiary clinton today was a reaffirmationf u.s. cmitment to suprt the transitional federal governmt of prident sharif. now, whathat means, it means... it basically means arms and iteans aid. now, inune the state department admitted that it had sent in around 40 tons rms and ammunitionto the transional federal government and hillary cnton said they will continueto provide arms and aunition. th will also help with training. but also tre will be a humanitarian aid aspect. arnd 40% of somalis ten million people areow inneed of humanitian aid. there's a drought which is affecting food production. plus, of cours the ongoing civil w which is causing terrible strife for people. thousands have di, hundreds of thousan have been forced from their homes. th
WETA
Aug 7, 2009 7:00pm EDT
to washington sain haqqani. ansteve coll, president of the new america foundaon and writer forhe "new yorker." he'she author of "ghost wars: the secret history othe cia, afghanistan and bin den." welome to you both mr. ambassador. let me begin withou. how confident are you, is ur government at masoud is dead. >> 100 perce zrpt can only achieved terna testing and a l of physical evidence has been processed. but other than thatthere are lot of points as a rest of this,most people lieve that he is, ieed, dead. and his own groupas announced that. >> and ifthat's the case, howsignificant would that bein terms of your government struggle against this militant movement? >> if hes indeed dead then that is definitely a major advance in proving pakistan's deternation and the determinatn of the unite states to elimate extrests and ter rusts om our region. course the death of one individu is still just the dea of unindividualhere ar others who are part of a oader movement and we wi have to continue to make sure that weliminate the hard-line irreconcilable elemen and that we reach t to those that we can
WETA
Aug 17, 2009 7:00pm EDT
out o making it easy fothe militan to ambush them. america's exit strategynvolves douing the size of its army in justa year, but will it be a match or experienced insurgents? >> they want to bui quantity rapidly, and i understanwhy. there is a l of area to cover, you know,ut if you go very fast in quantity, that's jus -- you can't achieve uality. >> captain porter debriefs t afghans, the lol police complaining they dot have any bulls. >> without munition, it is possible. i'm impont. i don't have ammunitio >> reporter: they also discussed the presidential elections. th voting booths will be rig next to whe the ambush was. they kn what sort of day it could be. >> during a votingday, weeed to put in positions. >> how much sanattle and h much wire -- how many sandbags we're going to need and how many wire we're going to nd. ♪ >> porter: so muc for their tortuous waiinside the stone bunkers, watchng here lke vieam's hamburger hill, the is noing but time to kill. >>hat night,hey're woke by an explosi, then gunfire. slplessness, dark, thy have to stay alert. but when a similar aack hit
WETA
Aug 19, 2009 7:00pm EDT
to go home. in america, we love to pise the puritan workthic and with reas. but this fall, it wld serve the country better to prse common sense and responsibity. >> lrer: companies were also advised to let at-riskmployees -- like pregnt women and people with chron diseases-- get ccinated first. the government planso have 45 million dosesf the swine flu vaccine on hand mid-october. on wall stre today, stocks and oil pricewere up after a government rept showed oil inventories were pleted, indicati energy demand is sing. the dow jones indusial average gained 61 points to clo at 9,279. the nasdarose 13 points to close at 1,969. thprice of crude oil climbed morthan 4%. in new yortrading, the cost of a barrel ssed $72. >> lehrer: and still to ce on the ewshour" tonight: the swiss nk deal; crowded california prisons; an"60 minutes" creator hewitt. that llows our health care reform update. tonight, we look at t squabbling amo democrats. "newshr" correspondent tom brden begins. >> porter: liral democrats are in an uproar aft the obama adminisation signaled over the weekend that a public opti was
WETA
Aug 20, 2009 7:00pm EDT
amera america asoon as 2030. ctics say connecting the wi power to the gridn a larger scale mrove difficult. but shirley says sheelieves it can haen. >> people ar excit about the opportunits that exist in green energy. and they want to know what can i do for my environment? what can i dofor my family? and what c ioor my state? and wind answers all three o those. >>eporter: wright wos at the local wal-mart and lives a home in edmund,klahoma, with his family as he studs. his dad nathan, sr.,was a roughneckil worker in the gulf of mexi straight out of high school and got out of the business when nath was young because after a boom came the ust of the '80s wich some say washe most dening economic event in oklahoma in the last halfcentury. >> i never wanted them to go into th business. i guess being 18 when i started, just wanted something that. ere you didn't just ha to get out there and eak his back everyday like so manyf these uys do. >> we've encouraged our ki don't put all your ducks in one tub. have bacp plan. don't ju have one skill, be flxible where yore not jst uck with one th
WETA
Aug 21, 2009 7:00pm EDT
latin america, going to latin amica to discover the art and wri about it in ameran and europe art journals. hodoes an artist take apart the visual world and reconfigure it toake it his own or her own. yoin a work of art that something thatelped me a lot as a po. my ptry is very visual as a result of that. i was born in cua. and although i ce at the age six, my familynd i came after the counist takeover in cuba. we arrived decber of 1960, first ing to chicago andventually moving to tampa. and then to miami. but when a rifed in miami in the '60s and then growi up here frothat point on, miami waa place where artistwere creating, were musicians werelaying, where writers were writing. and i came into contact with those ople. and it beme a living, vibnt, breathing thing. it wa't just a tragix, horrible histy it was now al a --hich i could belong and derive ipiration. growing upn miami any tropical fruit i ate could only be aad copy of the real fruit of cuba. exile meantaving to consume false fo and knowing it in advance. with joy my parents and grandmother would encounter flora-grow m
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